Compassionate Acceptance is Like Being in Love

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Practicing compassionate acceptance

is like being in love

and seeing the face of the beloved

in every moment

as if for the first time.

Cheri Huber

Zen Teacher, Cheri Huber, reminds us that every time we practice compassionate acceptance we open our hearts and fall in love with the person before us.  Compassion is not a sacrifice we make for the other, it is a celebration of our interdependence and the love that expands our world.

We often recoil in fear, afraid to reach out, and imagine the “other” may intrude on our space.  We forget that compassion does not oblige us, but rather enhances our liveliness and depth of experience.

Compassionate acceptance begins with ourselves.  Notice how you may treat yourself as “other”, speaking down to yourself as if you were another person.  Collapse the inner divide by taking a breath and letting go of the internal chatter….again and again.  This is an act of radical acceptance and love.

In your outer life challenge yourself to engage in the world freshly, even in the smallest of ways. Appreciate your housemate’s contributions to your life, learn about opportunities in your community to contribute to a cause or open a book that enriches your understanding of people who are suffering or in need.

Children naturally open to world with curiosity and caring, accepting sorrow as well as delight.  As adults, we need to actively remember that this compassionate acceptance is our fundamental nature and an opportunity to connect deeply in “every moment as if for the first time.”

China: Sacred Sites of the Divine Feminine

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Putuoshan Island is dedicated to the goddess of compassion, Guanyin. Above she is depicted on the central altar in Puji temple with a smaller statue of Tara below her.  Practitioners come in droves to pray for her mercy and offering gratitude for her blessings. Her large countenance creates a sense of awe when you enter the temple and there is a hushed quiet in the movement of men and women circumambulating her altar.

In September I will be returning to Putuoshan and other sacred sites in of Guanyin to guide a 12 day pilgrimage sponsored by True Nature Journeys.  Please check out: Sacred China and consider joining us!

Going Beyond Our Conditioning with Energy and Insight

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By trusting in our own resources of understanding, energy and insight we have access to the power to go beyond the boundaries of our conditioning.  We begin naturally to explore the depths and possibilities of our own being.

~ Christina Feldman

IMG_9546_lzn May you be blessed with energy and insight in the New Year!

Warmly, Deborah

P.S. Temple photos from my trip to Taiwan in 2010.

Sacred China: Pilgrimage to Guanyin

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Announcing a rare opportunity to journey to China next September to visit sites sacred to the Goddess of Compassion, Guanyin.  We will travel together as a small group of pilgrims and practice mindfulness to enhance our receptivity, wisdom and compassion.

The image above is from the Dazu grottos where we will see many beautiful statues and reliefs carved into caves and cliff sites.  These sacred images  from the 7th – 13 centuries are well preserved and still have their original paint.  We will also visit Anyue, Qingcheng and the island of Putuoshan, dedicated to Guanyin since the 9th century.

For more information on this pilgrimage, lead by Deborah Bowman and sponsored by True Nature Journeys, click this link: Sacred China.

For those of you looking for an armchair experience and lots of photos of these rare site, stay tuned to this blog in the coming months!

“A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent upon arriving.”

~ Tao te Ching

A Deeply Composed Mind: Words of Wisdom

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Therefore, the practice of generosity is about creating space.  We see our limits and we extend them continuously and consciously, joyfully, which creates an expansiveness and spaciousness of mind that’s deeply composed.

Sharon Salzberg

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These are two of my favorite photographs of the sculptures at the Dushanbe Tea House in Boulder, Colorado.  The light is constantly changing as are the lovely plants surrounding the figures of the seven beauties.  They remind me of a spacious and joyous mind that is deeply composed and in the world.

To see some of my other photos go to thefemalebuddha.com or luminousbuddha.com

 

 

Love in any Language is a Blessing

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When purified of self-centeredness, passion is expressed as devotion to others, caring skillfully and utterly about their welfare; it is also expressed as joy in living and appreciation of the unique beauty of each moment.

Judith Simmer-Brown

At Doi Suthep, a large and beautiful temple in northern Thailand, I took a photo of these bells hung around the complex by practitioners.  From each bell hung a ringer in the shape of a leaf from the Bodhi tree where the Buddha first experienced enlightenment.  Prayers and blessing are inscribed on the leaf by the individual who placed the bell.

The shape of the leaf reminds me of a heart and the heartfelt wishes of the person making his or her offering at the temple.  Many are hung to commemorate a loved one and wish them well on their journey after death.  Others are asking for relief from suffering for a family member or themselves.  Some ask for the blessing of a healthy child or acceptance into a job or university. As the wind moves the bells and releases their music the wishes are sent on their mission.

Many Buddhist practitioners may make a once in a lifetime pilgrimage to Doi Suthep as it is considered a great Buddhist site.  As I joined the many men and women circling the main stupa I felt a deep sense of reverence and joy shared by all.

 

Mindful Life on the Nine Dragons: Vietnam

UntitledMindfulness enables us to cultivate a different quality of attention, one where we relate to what we see before us not just as an echo of the past or a foreshadowing of the future, but more as it is right now.  Here too we find the power of kindness because we can connect to things as they are.

Sharon Salzberg

The Mekong River divides into nine channels known as the Nine Dragons at the delta in Vietnam.  Life on the river must be attentive to detail as the river has many undercurrents and is constantly changing. Many people live on the boats they work on and appear relaxed yet ever aware of their environment.  Sharon’s words of wisdom reminds me of the attitude of attention we observed when we spent the day in a boat exploring one of the dragons of the Mekong in south Vietnam.

 

 

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Approaching Guanyin’s Altar

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We approach Kwan Yin as who we are.  we welcome her into our real, everyday lives. We open ourselves to her as our individual minds and hearts can understand her.  This is how it has always been with Kwan Yin.  she offers her myriad forms to us and promises only as much as we are open to receive in and from ourselves.  She enters and becomes us, we enter and become her.

Sandy Boucher

 

These two images of Guanyin in Marble Mountain Cave in Vietnam struck me as two incarnations of the bodhisattva.  One older and carved from wood, unique in its depiction of her eternal connection to the ground of being. The other statue light and feminine, like a breeze of fresh air.  Their juxtaposition reminding me of the broad range her compassion and willingness to manifest as needed to relieve the suffering of the world.  How has she entered and become us?  How have we entered and become her?

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Making a Buddha: Women in Mandalay

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Therefore, the practice of generosity is about creating space.  We see our limits and we extend them continuously and consciously, joyfully, which creates an expansiveness and spaciousness of mind that’s deeply composed.

Sharon Salzberg

On one side of this narrow road in Mandalay men used power tools and chisels to carve the forms of many Buddhas and on the other side of the road women refined the figures by shaping the details and polishing the stone.  I was drawn to the gentle touch and concentration of these women.  They appeared generous in spirit and deeply composed like the Buddhas they were creating.

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TEMPLES OF SOUTH AND EAST ASIA: DISCOVERING THE SUBLIME IN A PHOTO

Free: Tues, Mar 11, 7 pm, Changes in Latitude, 2525 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, CO

Join Deborah Bowman in a search of the transcendent at temple sites in Asia.  Enjoy the draw of both famous and obscure sites at times of silence or among throngs at colorful festivals.   Come now to enjoy a feast of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas or learn tips for great shots at exquisite gardens or inside darkened temples.

Deborah Bowman, Ph.D., is a photographer, psychologist & professor at Naropa University.

Illumine Your Own Heart: Words of Rengetsu

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If you want to

Extend the light

Of the Dharma

Let it first illumine

Your own heart.

Rengetsu

Rengetsu’s Waka poem, a traditional form similar to Haiku, reminds us that we can only bring compassion to the world with the healing of our own hearts.

The Dharma represents the teachings of the Buddha and the truth he brought to the world, how compassion flows out of clear seeing that lifts the delusion of our separation from others.

I can only imagine the statue of the young girl at the entrance to Chion-in, an  temple complex in Kyoto, represents the pure heart with which we enter this world.

Female imagery at Buddhist temple sites in Kyoto is uncommon and remarkable when it appears.  It appeared that this figure had a quieting effect on the visitors as they walked toward the entrance gates.  I wondered if it represented Rengetsu, who was raised by a kindly monk within the temple of Chion-in over two centuries ago.

Please let me know what you know of this lovely statue!

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TEMPLES OF SOUTH AND EAST ASIA: DISCOVERING THE SUBLIME IN A PHOTO

FREE Talk/Slides: Tues, Mar 11, 7 pm, Changes in Latitude, 2525 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, CO

Join Deborah Bowman in a search of the transcendent at temple sites in Asia.  Enjoy the draw of both famous and obscure sites at times of silence or among throngs at colorful festivals.   Come now to enjoy a feast of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas or learn tips for great shots at exquisite gardens or inside darkened temples.

Deborah Bowman, Ph.D., is a photographer, psychologist & professor at Naropa University.